Focusing For Women

This fall, I'll be joining forces with my focusing colleague Annette to run a specialized group.

The details are:

Title: Focusing for Women - exploring a personal or professional issue
Mondays: late October - early December 6:30-8:30PM
Facilitated by: Annette Dubreuil and Nicole Mitchell

Turbocharged mindfulness to unpack your inner world for a better outer world. Over this 8 week women's group, participants will learn focusing as they work through an issue in their life. The women's group will create a space to share and learn more about ourselves and each other, with the goal of ultimately moving a sustainability objective forward.

The course is suitable for women who are both new and experienced Focusers.

Looking forward to it! Please let me know if you have any questions or would like further details! nicole@nicolemitchell.net

You can also check this website for further information: http://www.focusingonborden.com/focusing-for-women-fall-2017

De-stressed is the word

For those of us starting to feel cooped up now that we're in the dead of winter, it might be worth it to check in with ourselves to see how stressed we're feeling.  Staying de-stressed will be more beneficial.  Staying stressed, not so much. 

"Chronic Stress (Long-Term).
Everyday annoyances like heavy traffic or an overwhelming inbox—or sustained crises, such as unemployment or caring for a sick relative—can cause the body to activate the stress response constantly. The body and brain can’t reset hormones and inflammatory chemicals to normal levels, damaging the immune system and making you more likely to get sick".

For more information on that "stress response" please follow the link:

Source: http://www.popsci.com/what-happens-body-when-stressed

To help you de-stress, here are few things to try:

"Stay positive. Laughter has been found to lower levels of stress hormones, reduce inflammation in the arteries, and increase "good" HDL cholesterol.

Meditate. This practice of inward-focused thought and deep breathing has been shown to reduce heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure. Meditation's close relatives, yoga and prayer, can also relax the mind and body.

Exercise. Every time you are physically active, whether you take a walk or play tennis, your body releases mood-boosting chemicals called endorphins. Exercising not only melts away stress, it also protects against heart disease by lowering your blood pressure, strengthening your heart muscle, and helping you maintain a healthy weight.

Unplug. It's impossible to escape stress when it follows you everywhere. Cut the cord. Avoid emails and TV news. Take time each day — even if it's for just 10 or 15 minutes — to escape from the world.

Find ways to take the edge off your stress. Simple things, like a warm bath, listening to music, or spending time on a favorite hobby, can give you a much-needed break from the stressors in your life".

Source: http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/5-ways-to-de-stress-and-help-your-heart

There are also lots of other ways - find a healthy way that works well for you and begin to make room for it in your life.

Take care.

Tips That Might Help You Out During This Holiday Season

If you're enjoying yourself this holiday season, I wish you continued enjoyment!  

For those finding it difficult to navigate through the season that's upon us, here are a few ideas: 

  • "Temper your expectations. The notion of the “perfect” reunion can set you up for frustration and depression.
  • Call a friend if the family setting becomes unpleasant.
  • Take heed of alcohol consumption. It may seem relaxing in the short term, but its physiological effect can compound stress and depression.
  • Set comfortable limits. Determine how involved and accommodating your plans should be well in advance, and make your limits known to others involved.
  • Reach out to those with whom you have healthy, nurturing relationships. Get together with friends if a family setting is not feasible...

There is no quick cure here, nor an easy method you can use to ward off holiday depression, stress or overeating. However, I hope that some of these things may be helpful to you during this [often] stressful and possibly upsetting time of the year".

Source link: http://psychcentral.com/lib/helpful-hints-for-navigating-the-holidays/

Mindfulness and Meditation

Research is piling up that backs meditation and mindfulness....even with a younger population in a school setting.  Seems like this is something to pay attention to.

Meditation in school:
http://www.upworthy.com/this-school-replaced-detention-with-meditation-the-results-are-stunning?c=apstream

Science backs it up:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053810016300058

Some reasons to meditate:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/feeling-it/201309/20-scientific-reasons-start-meditating-today

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing)

EMDR may seem like a strange technique, but it is an interesting therapy option that can help people move past the debilitating effects of trauma (Trauma is "a deeply distressing or disturbing experience" as defined by "Oxford Dictionary").  Some people have likened it to the eye movement processing we do while we're dreaming (during REM [Rapid Eye Movement] sleep).

From client reports and from my own experience, I have noticed shifts as a result of using/doing EMDR. If you're curious about it, the links below will help define EMDR and hopefully give you a sense of what it's all about: 

https://emdrcanada.org/emdr-defined/
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-eye-movements-treat-trauma/?page=1

If you have any questions, please contact me.

Take care.

Attachment and Disorders

Years ago psychologists therorized that earlier attachments could affect us later in life.  Over the decades evidence has been piling up that this is not only true, but that attachment issues could be the root of some disorders.  Take addictions, for example - do you think it's possible that an attachment style in childhood could result in engaging in addictions later in life?  Philip J. Flores advocates for exactly this. He states that addiction is an attachment disorder. In my work I have seen this connection come to light many times over. For more clarification, please take a look at his book preview to see for yourself.  https://books.google.ca/books?id=we9VqAYovdoC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Social Anxiety Group

My colleague Jessica Zormann and I are offering new groups this summer and fall.  We are currently in the midst of the intake process and still have space for a couple of group memebers.  If you know of anyone who might benefit from this service, please let us know.  Please see our website (Confidence Building for Social Anxiety) for further information, or contact me directly.  Thanks and I hope you're having a lovely fall!

Nicole